The Fight for Equality: Animal Farm

Animal FarmAnimal Farm by George Orwell

“All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”


Although I enjoy reading fiction and read a fair amount of it (I earned my degree in English, after all), I recommend more non-fiction here on my site because for the most part, non-fiction tends to be more profitable to the mind and soul. However, I do feel there is merit to reading good fiction, which unfortunately is becoming more difficult to come by in this day and age. I find the most worthwhile fictional works were published before the 20th century, and certainly before about 1950. If you haven’t already checked it out, you can see my current list of fiction I believe every Christian should read, which I continue to add to as titles come to mind or are brought to my attention.  After reading a review of Animal Farm by a fellow Goodreads member, Natalie Vellacott, I realized that it was a novel that I should add to my list of recommended fiction. Now there have only been a couple of times that I have posted or reblogged a review that I did not write myself. And Natalie’s great review was so on-point that I figured, Why invent the wheel? I asked Natalie’s permission to share her review here, and she graciously agreed.

Animal Farm (1945) is an allegorical satire by George Orwell (himself a Socialist) which he wrote to criticize and expose the problems with Communism under the Soviet Union’s totalitarian leader, Joseph Stalin. I will let Natalie take it from here: Continue reading “The Fight for Equality: Animal Farm”

The Making of a Perfect World, Part 1: Utopia

Utopia by Sir Thomas More

“The source of happiness is much disputed, among all people, in Utopia.” – Thomas More
 
“They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.” – Benjamin Franklin


One of my favorite genres of literature is dystopia, but before I talk about dystopian fiction, let’s take a look at its predecessor. Most people are familiar with the term utopia, which originated with the fictional work by Thomas More published in 1516. Utopia was written shortly after the discovery of the New World, an event which stimulated the human imagination and brought with it a sense of new possibilities. It can be considered the first English science fiction, as the story describes an unreal place (located in the New World) which could be real (at least hypothetically) in the future. More’s imaginative society represents an ideal one in which many social problems are controlled or eliminated, such as war, crime and poverty, yet its plans for social improvement are in many ways impractical. Ironically, and significantly, the word utopia can literally be translated as “good place” or “no place,” suggesting that the author acknowledged that there is no such thing as a perfect society. Continue reading “The Making of a Perfect World, Part 1: Utopia”

How NOT to Fix the World: 10 Books That Screwed Up the World

Wiker-bookcover10 Books That Screwed Up the World (And 5 Others That Didn’t Help) by Dr. Benjamin Wiker

“[Progress] is bringing us to a new age of technological barbarism, wherein humanity becomes ever more religiously obsessed with health and sexual pleasure as pseudo-gods, sacrificing anything and everything to these twin deities.”


Ideas are important because ideas are what generate all behavior and action. Proverbs 23:7 reminds us that, “As a man thinks, so is he.” In fact, as a result of publishing their thoughts, the greatest thinkers of history have inspired and motivated others to take action of some kind.

Nobody can deny that the world has problems: poverty, disease, war, ignorance, crime — just to name a few. I guess most people would consider it a noble thing for a person to dedicate his life to eradicating one or more of these social evils, and there have been and are many such individuals. But there are right ways to go about it and wrong ways. Continue reading “How NOT to Fix the World: 10 Books That Screwed Up the World”