Christ’s Death: For All, Some or None?

Introductory Essay to John Owen’s The Death of Death in the Death of Christ by J. I. Packer

…we speak of God’s love as if it were no more than a general willingness to receive any who will turn and trust; and we depict the Father and the Son, not as sovereignly active in drawing sinners to themselves, but as waiting in quiet impotence “at the door of our hearts” for us to let them in…this set of twisted half-truths is something other than the biblical gospel.” – Packer


English: John Owen (1616-1683)I’ve heard it said that the works of Puritan pastor and theologian John Owen need to be read aloud or standing up in order to avoid falling asleep! It’s not so much that the material is boring per se, but that Owen’s writing style is difficult to wade through and the effort, while worth it, can be mentally taxing. Owen’s classic work, The Death of Death in the Death of Christ, published in 1648, biblically explores the subject of the atonement — that is, the purpose and effect of Christ’s death in carrying out God’s plan of redemption. Owen’s purpose was to show “that the doctrine of universal redemption is unscriptural and destructive to the gospel.” He discusses in depth the question, “For whom did Christ suffer and die?” with three possible answers: 1) All of the sins of all men; 2) Some of the sins of all men; or 3) All of the sin of some men. Of course, only one of these can be the true answer, and the answer must come from Scripture, not from one’s preconceived notions, opinions, or feelings. Continue reading “Christ’s Death: For All, Some or None?”

A False Gospel + False Methods = False Believers : Today’s Gospel

todaysgospelToday’s Gospel: Authentic or Synthetic? by Walter Chantry

“Our ears have grown accustomed to hearing men told to ‘accept Jesus as your personal Savior’, a form of words which is not found in Scripture. It has become an empty phrase. These may be precious words to the Christian – ‘personal Savior’ – but they are wholly inadequate to instruct a sinner in the way to eternal life.”


In Today’s Gospel, Walter Chantry examines the methods and message that is being delivered in today’s efforts to evangelize the lost. Some may say, “What does it matter, as long as people are coming to Christ?” But Chantry submits that it does matter, because if the message being preached or the methods being used are not Biblical, the result may be “converts” who continue to live carnal lives, who struggle with doubt and assurance of salvation, and whose faith withers away just as the seed that falls on the thorny or rocky ground. Or worse, these “converts” are sent away with a false sense of security after making a decision and repeating a formula prayer, when in fact they may not be regenerated at all. Chantry challenges all who share the Gospel, whether from a pulpit, on the mission field, or in one-on-one relationships, to consider if they are communicating the whole Gospel message. Continue reading “A False Gospel + False Methods = False Believers : Today’s Gospel”