Shakespeare’s Kate, A Character in Camouflage: Taming the Shrew

The Shrew Katherina (1898) by Edward Robert Hughes. (Photo credit: Wikipedia )
The Shrew Katherina (1898) by Edward Robert Hughes. (Photo credit: Wikipedia )

The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare

Well, come, my Kate; we will unto your father’s
Even in these honest mean habiliments:
Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor;
For ’tis the mind that makes the body rich;
And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds,
So honour peereth in the meanest habit.

When I was working on my English degree, I was required to take two Shakespeare classes, and I’ve read almost all of his plays (well, only a few of the history plays!). I really came to love Shakespeare; with practice, he does get easier as you get more familiar with the language, but you definitely want to use an edition that has footnotes. It would be tough for me to say which is my favorite play – I have several, and The Taming of the Shrew is definitely one of them. I enjoy the slapstick elements, the bantering dialogue between the characters, the disguises and confused identities. But mostly I love the story itself, the story of a couple who unintentionally falls in love, and how love and respect can bring out the best in anyone. Continue reading “Shakespeare’s Kate, A Character in Camouflage: Taming the Shrew”